How To Learn A Language In 3 Months

Tourists inspect a map in Berlin. Adam Berry/Getty Preface by Tim Ferriss I've written about how I learned to speak, read, and write Japanese, Mandarin, and Spanish. I've also covered my experiments with German, Indonesian, Arabic, Norwegian, Turkish, and perhaps a dozen others.

 There are only few language learners who dazzle me, and Benny Lewis is one of them. This definitive guest post by Benny will teach you: How to speak your target language today. How to reach fluency and exceed it within a few months.  

How to pass yourself off as a native speaker. And finally, how to tackle multiple languages to become a "polyglot"-all within a few years, perhaps as little as 1-2. It contains TONS of amazing resources I never even knew existed, including the best free apps and websites for becoming fluent in record time. Want to find a native speaker to help you for $5 per hour? Free resources and memory tricks? It's all here.  



This is a post you all requested, so I hope you enjoy it! Enter Benny You are either born with the language-learning gene, or you aren't. Luck of the draw, right? At least, that's what most people believe. Benny Lewis, world traveler and language master. Courtesy of Benny Lewis I think you can stack the deck in your favor. Years ago, I was a language learning dud. The worst in my German class in school, only able to speak English into my twenties, and even after six entire months living in Spain, I could barely muster up the courage to ask where the bathroom was in Spanish. But this is about the point when I had an epiphany, changed my approach, and then succeeded not only in learning Spanish, but in getting a C2 (Mastery) diploma from the Instituto Cervantes, working as a professional translator in the language, and even being interviewed on the radio in Spanish to give travel tips. Since then, I moved on to other languages, and I can now speak more than a dozen languages to varying degrees between conversational and mastery.

 It turns out, there is no language-learning gene, but there are tools and tricks for faster learning… As a "polyglot"-someone who speaks multiple languages-my world has opened up. I have gained access to people and places that I never otherwise could have reached. I've made friends on a train in China through Mandarin, discussed politics with a desert dweller in Egyptian Arabic Online Travel MarketPlace, discovered the wonders of deaf culture through ASL, invited the (female) president of Ireland to dance in Irish (Gaeilge) and talked about it on live Irish radio, interviewed Peruvian fabric makers about how they work in Quechua, interpreted between Hungarian and Portuguese at a social event… and well, had an extremely interesting decade traveling the world.  

Such wonderful experiences are well within the reach of many of you. Since you may be starting from a similar position to where I was (monolingual adult, checkered history with language learning, no idea where to start), I'm going to outline the tips that worked best for me as I went from zero to polyglot. This very detailed post should give you everything you need to know.

 So, let's get started! 1. Learn the right words, the right way. Starting a new language means learning new words. Lots of them. Of course, many people cite a bad memory for learning new vocab, so they quit before even getting started. But-here's the key-you absolutely do not need to know all the words of a language to speak it (and in fact, you don't know all the words of your mother tongue either). As Tim pointed out in his own post on learning any language in 3 months, you can take advantage of the Pareto principle here, and realize that 20% of the effort you spend on acquiring new vocab could ultimately give you 80% comprehension in a language-for instance, in English just 300 words make up 65% of all written material.

We use those words a lot, and that's the case in every other language as well. You can find pre-made flash card "decks" of these most frequent words (or words themed for a subject you are more likely to talk about) for studying on the Anki app (available for all computer platforms and smartphones) that you can download instantly. Good flashcard methods implement a spaced repetition system (SRS), which Anki automates. This means that rather than go through the same list of vocabulary in the same order every time, you see words at strategically spaced intervals, just before you would forget them. Tim himself likes to use color-coded physical flashcards; some he purchases from Vis-Ed, others he makes himself. He showed me an example when I interviewed him about how he learns languages in the below video. Though this entire video can give you great insight into Tim's language learning approach, the part relevant to this point is at 27:40 (full transcript here).

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